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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by Brian Conway on Today at 04:50:54 pm »
Question rogerpir; using this FORD 5310-A tool are you able to replace the upper insulator ?  Just curious.  Looking at the pictures in the shop manuals 65,66 and 69 it doesn't appear so.  Thanks,  Brian
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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by rogerpir on Today at 03:36:57 pm »
  Amen to john's comment about quality tools. I skimp on money all the time for other stuff  but I have learned that quality tools pay for themselves a hundred times over. I will add one caveat in that quality tools are harder and harder to find. For example, I would be happy to pay top price for the Moog but it got priced out by this cheap junk and it is nowhere to be found.
  HOWEVER!!! I was indeed able to get the original factory Ford 5310-A coil compressor!!! A gentleman who was a chief mechanic at a Ford dealership was getting out of the hobby and was willing to sell it to me for just $250. Man, this thing is a beast. I put a ratchet next to it so you can get an idea of the size of it. Pure, solid American steel. It must weigh 30 pounds or more. I already did the passenger side and it wound up those coils with one hand like they were spaghetti. A little girl could turn the handle. The guy I got it from said it would take him 15 minutes per side to replace coils. Really a clever design. The way it is set up, the greater the tension, the stronger the tool holds. Took some pics. It is the 5310-A2 which differs slightly from the 5310-A that is pictured in the manual. I assume it is the second generation of the tool that improved on the original. I think I have a new favorite tool!   
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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by 70cj428 on Today at 11:40:38 am »
Quote
Been using mine 30+ years and none of those things ever happened. The photo of the ty wraps is dangerously stupid.

++++1

I've been using the Snap On compressor for 20+ years and never had an issue. The big problem I've noticed people having with a lot of spring compressors and pullers is that they don't properly lubricate the screw threads before every use (Read the instructions) Any spring compressor/puller can gall and seize if used dry. Another issue is people penny pinching when buying tools, saving a hundred bucks by buying a harbor freight compressor over a good one may seem like a good idea (especially if your only going to use it once ....) right up until something fails or goes wrong and you either damage the car or yourself. Another area you see this in is in valve spring compressors. If you've ever had a triple spring get loose, you know what I mean, yet people still buy cheap Chinese junk.

As for the zip tie mess, if your cheap enough to try this, I'm sure your using the best zip ties that the Chinese can mold out of old soda bottles, and you kinda deserve to get whacked with the spring. ( kinda the Darwin / survival of the fittest thing .......)

JMHO, John
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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by RoyceP on Today at 10:19:20 am »
Been using mine 30+ years and none of those things ever happened. The photo of the ty wraps is dangerously stupid.



Been using the Snap On coil spring compressor for about 35 years. Before that I was renting one like this because I could not afford one of my own.





I totally agree with Royce. This is the version I have used for years. I also use an electric impact gun to compress/de-compress the springs. NEVER had an issue, or a spring come loose and cause damage or harm to myself or others. Lastly, be VARY careful and take your time, safety IS important!

This is a pretty good spring spring compressor. Except if....
You don't care that the paint is scraped off your newly detailed springs.
You don't worry about one or both ends screwing themselves up or down the spring.
This compressor only grabs the center coils of the spring and it ends up shaped like a banana that won't go back in right to reinstall.
When you finally get the spring into position,you can't get the socket on the nut.
The screw seizes up and then you have a big problem. (this can and has happened)

This is a really good general use compressor and I have one in my box but the vehicle specific tool Rockhouse recommends is the only way to go for this situation.
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Lost and Found / Re: SCJ registered?
« Last post by rush on Today at 09:06:51 am »
I've sent the last registered owner (circa 2004) a mail note. We'll see if they respond and what they say.

Sorry, the email got bounced due to an invalid email address.

Very sad...

Thanks a lot for your effort!
I have the name of the previous owner and try to figure it out.

Thanks again!
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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by b--r30 on Today at 08:39:47 am »
Been using the Snap On coil spring compressor for about 35 years. Before that I was renting one like this because I could not afford one of my own.





I totally agree with Royce. This is the version I have used for years. I also use an electric impact gun to compress/de-compress the springs. NEVER had an issue, or a spring come loose and cause damage or harm to myself or others. Lastly, be VARY careful and take your time, safety IS important!

This is a pretty good spring spring compressor. Except if....
You don't care that the paint is scraped off your newly detailed springs.
You don't worry about one or both ends screwing themselves up or down the spring.
This compressor only grabs the center coils of the spring and it ends up shaped like a banana that won't go back in right to reinstall.
When you finally get the spring into position,you can't get the socket on the nut.
The screw seizes up and then you have a big problem. (this can and has happened)

This is a really good general use compressor and I have one in my box but the vehicle specific tool Rockhouse recommends is the only way to go for this situation.

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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by redscj on Today at 08:35:19 am »
There are all sorts of ways to get hurt working on cars and when it happens it's almost always the unexpected.
     There is some logic for that. If you knew or could recognize the danger then most people wouldn't do it.
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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by 69cobrajetrugae2 on Today at 12:20:58 am »
There are all sorts of ways to get hurt working on cars and when it happens it's almost always the unexpected.

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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by redscj on September 20, 2017, 08:12:57 pm »
...I don't agree with the primary clamping method used in the pics although the wire ties would be a wise secondary safety measure as well as welding gloves and a full face shield.

When I first looked at that photo with all the heavy duty plastic tie-wraps, I couldn't help but laugh, but the more I thought about it the more I thought it was pretty damn clever...it certainly has plenty of redundancy!  I'd feel better knowing the strength specs on the tie-wraps before hand, if there even are such specs, but I'm guessing that they probably are strong enough, with so many sharing the load.  If there were a failure, it would probably be progressive and not the near instantaneous release that can make compressed springs so dangerous.

No tools required...just tie-wrap the heck out of the spring with the vehicle weight on it, then jack the vehicle up and remove the spring.  I might feel more comfortable with that setup than some of the Harbor Freight crap that I've seen.
     I have to agree, I think its better than most would think. My issue is that the ties seem to get brittle with age. So at least use relatively new ones.
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General Discussion / Re: front coil spring compressor
« Last post by geraldt52 on September 20, 2017, 08:01:56 pm »
...I don't agree with the primary clamping method used in the pics although the wire ties would be a wise secondary safety measure as well as welding gloves and a full face shield.

When I first looked at that photo with all the heavy duty plastic tie-wraps, I couldn't help but laugh, but the more I thought about it the more I thought it was pretty damn clever...it certainly has plenty of redundancy!  I'd feel better knowing the strength specs on the tie-wraps before hand, if there even are such specs, but I'm guessing that they probably are strong enough, with so many sharing the load.  If there were a failure, it would probably be progressive and not the near instantaneous release that can make compressed springs so dangerous.

No tools required...just tie-wrap the heck out of the spring with the vehicle weight on it, then jack the vehicle up and remove the spring.  I might feel more comfortable with that setup than some of the Harbor Freight crap that I've seen.
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